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There is an interesting phenomenon that exists in our world. It is that we begin with the presupposition that it is “our world.” I grew up in the church and in many ways this view was reinforced, afterall Adam was given dominion over all the Creation.

There are so many ways we express this belief of ‘dominion’ whether it be in our insatiable appetite for resources or our feelings of entitlement to space or time. Maybe this is why Sabbath has become nearly impossible amonst us. To participate in Sabbath is to give up control and therefore dominion (we must concede to participate).

It is an intriguing thing when we look at ancient Israel. Their posture towards creation was much different than our own. We never read of them building a bridge, rather they cross through the water. Other than when G_d calls them ‘up’ they found themselves walking around the mountains. The landscape was not theirs to conquer but to partner withh. They had a posture of sojourner, wandering in a land not their own.

Then enters Rome with their famous roads that forced the landscape to submit to their whims – bridges over water and stairways up the sides of mountains. The first highways…progress…dominion! They did not view themselves as sojourners in a land not theirs, rather they were the lords of these lands. The land was theirs to do with as they pleased. Rome did not only enslave peoples they also enslaved nature.

Today we have carried on the tradition(s) and mindset(s) of the Romans. Constantly striving to find ways to make the world a slave to our desires and wants. We forget that the LORD made a covenant with all creatures and all of nature (Gen. 8) – not just man. We live as though the earth ‘owes’ us whatever we desire. We hollow out the earth so we can drive over it. We cut off the top of mountains so we can enjoy our four-wheel drive SUVs. We treat animals barbarically (though barbarians were probably more civil to their animals) in order that we can have meat on the cheap and with every single meal.

Though I understand that this stream of thought is slanted heavily towards an environmental bent…that is not really my point (at least not my main point). My main point is what does the way you live your life say about what you believe? What is our part in the covenants of Genesis 8? Do you live as though you are a guest in the home of the LORD or do you treat the earth and all that inhabits it as endentured servants?

What questions are we not asking when it comes to living a life that reflects what we believe?

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